Researchers See Comeback For Europe’s Rare Animals

The Wilding of Europe

That sent confidence reeling in the Old World. Talk about role reversal. For some time, it seemed, U.S. hopes for a robust recovery were being held back by the risk created by the economic failures of Europe. Now it looks like the public perception here is that our problems are homegrown. The political firmament in Europe looks more solid, buoyed by this month’s election success of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The consumer confidence measures are important because they tend to signal if shoppers will buy and businesses will hire. Economists pay attention to confidence indicators not just for what they show about today, but for what they suggest about the future. A decline, as the U.S. has seen in the last couple of months, suggests that buyers and employers may hunker down in the months ahead. Fair warning to the White House and Congress: People are paying attention.

 

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Researchers see comeback for Europe’s rare animals AP 1:02 p.m. EDT September 26, 2013 European bison also known as wisent, gather in the woods near Bad Berleburg, Germany in September. (Photo: Marius Becker, AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe Study claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction Researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril SHARE 1 CONNECT 20 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE BERLIN (AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe thanks to decades-long conservation efforts. A study published Thursday by the London Zoological Society claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction and some are now thriving. Researchers from BirdLife International and the European Bird Census Council contributed to the study, which found that protecting habitats, restricting hunting, reducing pollution and the careful reintroduction were key to the species’ survival. The population of European bison, also known as wisent, has increased more than 3,000 percent since the 1950s, the study said. Still, researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril. Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. USA NOW

Mammals and birds are recorded thoroughly and well known in Europe, so it is rewarding for people to note a revival, following their historic losses. Originating after the last Ice Age from Asia and Africa the 219 European mammals are most diverse in the east with endemic European species mainly found in the Pyrenees and the Alps. These animals have speciated at these isolated altitudes because of the distance from west Asia where their ancestors lived Birds comprise 530 species without the vagrants and non-native species. 30 are endemic, mainly on the islands around Europe. Species (and families) are very much shared with Asia and North America, but the diversity is poor. With 740 million humans in a small continent, the crowded-out animals are in trouble, especially the Amphibia, followed by the Reptilia, then the mammalian residents. Mammals and birds and others have been harvested, persecuted, driven out and forced into change over thousands of years. This could have resulted in the lack of bird diversity overall and that of mammals in the west. The source for all this information is a great addition to Europe’s many descriptive texts on fauna and flora. There are 37 conserved species studied here, in an extensive set of data, including many historic distributions, drawn up by Stefanie Deinet and her co-workers of the European Bird Census Council in Nijmegen, Birdlife international in Cambridge, ZSL (London) and the Centre for Biodiversity and Environmental Research at University College, London. The Swedish Postcode Lottery, the Liberty Wildlife Fund and ARK Nature granted the resources to enable this giant project to be completed.