France Moves To Impose Sanctions Against Google Over Privacy Policy

Without regular documentation of their residence, they have a hard time enrolling children into school, applying for subsidized housing, getting health care through the national system or finding permanent work. Amnesty said those problems are compounded with each forced evacuation, pushing the Roma further out to society’s margins. In releasing its tally of evictions including one as recent as Sept. 18 Amnesty brought together a doctor and a teacher who had both cared for Roma from families they said wanted to join French society, contrary to the image of Roma as resistant to integration. “What we see on the ground is a break with the stereotypes of social and sanitary problems, and other cliches that are being invoked now,” said Jean-Francois Corty, a doctor with Medecins du Monde. “Most of the people we see want to integrate, want work, want their children in schools and want the benefits of modern medicine.” Roma started arriving in Europe from India in the 14th century and there are an estimated 8 million in Europe, with the largest population in Romania. Facing discrimination and bleak prospects in Romania, many head west to France and other richer European countries. There are an estimated 20,000 Roma in France, a population that has remained stable over several years despite repeated attempts by both Socialist and conservative governments to persuade them sometimes forcibly to return home. Many French blame the Roma for a rise in petty crime and an influx of street beggars, especially in tourist areas of Paris, where crime rings involving children have been broken up, and where subway announcements warn every few minutes against pickpockets. In Sweden, police this week acknowledged compiling a secret, illegal registry of more than 4,000 Roma, including children, coming under criticism from politicians who said it was unconstitutional to register people by ethnicity. French Interior Minister Manuel Valls provoked anger Tuesday for saying the Roma migrants had a “duty to return to their homeland” and despite a wave of criticism, refused to back down Wednesday.

Alitalia’s Higher Loss Risks Deterring Air France Investment

In a prepared statement, the Venezuelan Attorney General’s Office said 17 people have been arrested in the drug trafficking case. The flight originated at Simon Bolivar International Airport in Caracas, the Venezuelan capital. An Air France executive in Venezuela, six airline employees, a security guard and a loading platform supervisor are among those arrested. Eight members of the Venezuelan national guard are also in custody and were scheduled to appear in front of a judge Wednesday afternoon for a preliminary hearing. On September 11, French authorities discovered 1.3 tons of pure cocaine stuffed inside 30 suitcases on the flight. The colorful bags did not match any of the passengers on board, CNN affiliate BFMTV reported. Coast Guard makes $20 million cocaine bust Huge drug bust off the coast of Florida Drug busts at sea: 4 tons of cocaine The street value of the stash is about 200 million euros, or $270 million. Woman busted in Spain for cocaine in breast implants Authorities worked with Spanish, British and Dutch police on the investigation, BFMTV said. This case “illustrates the importance of strengthening International cooperation in the fight against traffickers,” French Interior Minister Manuel Valls said. Suspected drug smugglers sail to jail In Venezuela, authorities promised a swift investigation as soon as the confiscation was announced in Paris. All 17 arrests were made in less than three days. Venezuelan Interior and Justice Minister Miguel Rodriguez Torres told reporters in Venezuela that authorities think an organized crime group with Italian and British members is responsible for the shipment. “The suitcases were not taken into the plane through the regular baggage platforms at the airport.

Alitalia, which has been been losing money amid a weak Italian economy and competition from discount carriers, has undergone a management reshuffle this year after Chief Executive Officer Andrea Ragnetti resigned in February following widening losses. Clearly the mounting losses pose a challenge, said Donal ONeill, an analyst at Goodbody Stockbrokers. Despite the apparent synergies it may have with Alitalia, it would be deleterious, in my view, for Air France-KLM to invest in a business that faces significant competitive threat on both its long haul and short haul operations. Convertible Bond Air France declined as much as 1.6 percent to 7.22 euros and traded at 7.25 euros as of 10:57 a.m. in Paris, valuing the airline at 2.2 billion euros ($3 billion) The Italian airline proposed investors boost funding by completing a subscription of 55 million euros through a bond convertible into stock. 14 to vote on the increase. Air France members on the Alitalia board opposed the plan, news agency Ansa reported, without saying where it got the information. An Air France spokesman declined to comment. Air France said Sept. 23 it would await more information from the Italian carriers board before committing to any move. Hiring Advisers The relatively small capital increase being sought suggests the move is only a short or mid-term solution, said Yan Derocle, an analyst at Oddo Securities in Paris. Air France has hired Lazard Ltd. (LAZ) and Mediobanca SpA (MB) as advisers to consider its options on Alitalia, Italy s Messaggero reported this week, without saying where it obtained the information.

Arrests made in Air France flight cocaine case

France’s CNIL (Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertes) said it will initiate “a formal procedure for imposing sanctions, according to the provisions laid down in the French data protection law.” The CNIL had given Google three months to make changes to its privacy policy. On the final day before the deadline, Google contested the request, “notably the applicability of the French data protection law to the services used by residents in France,” CNIL said. As a result, the changes were not made, and CNIL made good on its sanction threat. At issue is an update to Google’s privacy policy that went into effect on March 1, 2012 . The revamp consolidated 70 or so privacy policies across Google’s products down to one. But with this change, Google also switched to one profile for users across all services rather than separate logins for offerings like YouTube, Search, and Blogger. It’s that account consolidation bit that had privacy advocates up in arms. In early Feb. 2012, the EU’s Article 29 Working Party asked Google to “pause” its privacy policy update, but Google declined. By October, CNIL issued several recommendations that covered how Google might improve its privacy policies, but Google did not make any changes. In Feb. 2013, CNIL criticized Google for not responding to its privacy-related inquiries in a timely fashion. In April, it announced plans to crack down on Google, and by June, it threatened sanctions and imposed the three-month deadline. Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but has consistently argued that it does not believe its revamped privacy policy runs afoul of any privacy rules. The CNIL said its request wanted Google to: Define specified and explicit purposes Inform users with regard to the purposes of the processing implemented Define retention periods for the personal data processed Not proceed, without legal basis, with the potentially unlimited combination of users’ data Fairly collect and process passive users’ data Inform users and then obtain their consent in particular before storing cookies in their terminal.